Frequently Asked Questions

Video: Interview with Jan at a Schools’ Presentations event at Monkey World, Dorset.

Primary PSHE

Jan Lever

Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, is the culmination of Jan Lever’s 30+ years’ experience in teaching and advisory work, alongside her 10 years’ experience as a counsellor and psychotherapist. It has taken many hundreds of hours to write, and much dedication and commitment from all those involved.

Its mission is to support very busy teachers to deliver high-quality Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education to the children in their schools; to bring fun and creativity into PSHE Education whilst ensuring a developmental and progressive curriculum.

The heart of our motivation for Jigsaw is to make things better for children, both now and in their futures.

Questions about content

Does Jigsaw support the Safeguarding agenda?

Ofsted has stated that schools and colleges should be safe environments where children and young people can learn. Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about the keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.

From the Early Years onwards, children are taught about what to say and do if they don’t like something – from encountering strangers to bullying, and from unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths.

Read the Safeguarding article here.

How does Jigsaw contribute to British Values education?

This is an easy one to answer, as Jigsaw contributes to British Values in every single lesson!

We have mapped all Jigsaw lessons against the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs and found that ALL Jigsaw lessons contribute to one or more of these values in some way.

There are two mapping documents: one showing how each Puzzle contributes overall, and the other demonstrating how each individual lesson contributes.

For example, as you would expect, the ‘Being Me In My World’ Puzzle covers lots of the values in most lessons, where citizenship is learnt about; but the ‘Healthy Me’ Puzzle there are also ample opportunities for learning about mutual respect, individual liberty and the rule of law.

You can take a look at the British Values maps here.

Does Jigsaw support the prevention of extremism and radicalisation agenda?

Jigsaw does not cover radicalisation and extremist behaviour explicitly, as the concepts themselves are perhaps not appropriate for teaching about in primary schools: whilst we want to prepare children for life, at the same time we do not want to alarm them. Rather, Jigsaw makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that children experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish. This contribution emerges first and foremost through the overall character of the Jigsaw scheme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the programme.

Children are taught to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others.

See the article on Radicalisation here.

Will Jigsaw help us with SMSC?

smsc-bv-discYes, indeed! Even if SMSC were not a high priority for Ofsted, we would still value these aspects of children’s development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them. We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure balanced coverage.

Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to this target and the SMSC symbol clearly indicates which elements are enhanced in each lesson.

Does Jigsaw fit the new PSHE Association Programmes of Study?

Every aspect of the PSHE Association’s programme of study is covered in Jigsaw. We have mapped out where each strand occurs and the mapping grid is freely accessible here.

The mapping process showed us that as well as covering the outcomes in the Programme of Study, Jigsaw also places a lot of emphasis on emotional literacy and personal development, more than is suggested in the Programme of Study, which can be seen here.

Does Jigsaw cover the non-statutory framework for PSHE?

The Non-Statutory National Framework for PSHE KS1 and 2 was written in 2000 and sets out what the curriculum content for PSHE in the Primary phase needs to be. You can find out more here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-framework-for-key-stages-1-to-4/the-national-curriculum-in-england-framework-for-key-stages-1-to-4.

Jigsaw covers all of this framework AND MORE!

The DfE has not updated the Framework since then, though the PSHE Association has written a more up-to-date Programme of Study in 2013 (and updated in 2014). With this in mind, Jigsaw PSHE Ltd has produced a mapping document which cross-references Jigsaw content and the updated Programme of Study from the PSHE Association.  It covers everything in the Programme of Study, and more, including lots on children’s emotional and mental health and well-being; see https://www.jigsawpshe.com/jigsaw-and-the-pshe-association-programme-of-study-2013-making-connections for the accompanying article including a mapping grid.

Is the Jigsaw sex education controversial?

The Jigsaw sex education Pieces in the Changing Me Puzzle aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development. It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear.

We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safe-guarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle.

Is the SRE in Jigsaw suitable for Catholic schools?

The SRE that we teach in Jigsaw has two main functions: to help children enjoy successful relationships (with friends, siblings, parents, etc.) and to keep them safe, now and in the future. The Jigsaw sex education Pieces (lessons) in the Changing Me Puzzle (unit) aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development. It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safeguarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle (as there is throughout Jigsaw).

The sex education in Jigsaw is progressive and developmental and has a strong focus on children understanding the changes that their bodies go through, so that they can grow up without fear or embarrassment.

The SRE materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit apppropriately with the individual philosophy and ethos of that school. Catholic schools will obviously need to check their own diocesan advice during this process.

There are lots of Catholic schools using Jigsaw and some of these are implementing the Changing Me materials as they are, others have tweaked them to fit their requirements. For example, in Jigsaw we use specially-designed animations to help teach some of the elements of sex education: most schools use the animations, while some schools choose not to. It’s your choice – there is no obligation either way.

We are very happy to assist with this if you decide to purchase Jigsaw and we do run SRE training sessions every March to enable schools to look at these materials with us in plenty of time before delivering them in Summer 2.

Why do Jigsaw Changing Me lessons only refer to the ‘vagina’ when teaching female body parts, when this is an internal part of the body and the ‘vulva’ is the external part of the female genitalia?

We do understand the issue and we will probably add ‘vulva’ as an additional label on the Jigsaw materials ready for next year’s Changing Me time in Summer 2. When Jigsaw was written just a couple of years ago there was much resistance to even teaching the words we HAVE included that we decided to move this forward a step at a time, so I am pleased we may now be in a position to have more body parts words accepted.

Of course, we know that the ‘vagina’ is internal and there is no intention of the current word list being misleading, but rather we were trying to focus children’s learning on the parts of the female body most relevant to understanding puberty (where the bleeding comes from) and where babies come from, hence ‘vagina’ being the word we felt we needed to include first.

Teachers will be explaining that the vagina is inside the female body as part of the lessons.

There is nothing to stop your school deciding to add ‘vulva’, or indeed any other body parts you believe to be relevant and appropriate, to the body parts taught in Jigsaw, if you think this is beneficial, in whichever year group/s you see fit.

Please remember that the underpinning values of respect and privacy are paramount, always remembering that one of the main purposes of this work is safeguarding and child protection.

Can I buy just the Relationships and Changing Me Puzzles?

With any scheme of work that is progressive and developmental, splitting it up into separate units could mean that its integrity is lost, as these separated units could perhaps be viewed as an add-on, which, in our view, is not the point of high-quality PSHE.

If children and staff haven’t used the whole scheme up to that point, jumping in with potentially the most sensitive elements of the scheme could be more than challenging, particularly as the scheme’s philosophy and approach are unique. Therefore, to maintain the fidelity of the scheme, we do not offer individual units separately.

Is there Financial Education in Jigsaw?

There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers. For the younger year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future. For older year groups, the emphasis is more on jobs and careers, and also on supporting others with fundraising, etc. For example, in Year 5, there are lessons on children’s dream jobs and the steps they need to take to get there, what people in a variety of jobs earn and how everyone makes a contribution in society. The end of Puzzle outcomes also offer opportunities for enterprise and learning about money and finance e.g. building a garden of Dreams and Goals enables children to collaborate to raise money for charity.

What about children with reading/literacy difficulties?

We understand the need to differentiate the Jigsaw materials to meet the needs of all children in each teacher’s class. As a universal core curriculum, Jigsaw cannot do this successfully because children’s needs are so different. Therefore, differentiation is by outcome and each teacher’s responsibility. The varied array of teaching and learning activities throughout Jigsaw allows ample opportunities for literacy development.

How do I differentiate a Jigsaw lesson for my SEN children?

At the end of each Jigsaw Puzzle in every year group, there is a grid showing the national P-levels. For each level we suggest activities suitable for children working at that level and that are focussed on the learning themes of that Puzzle. These P-level grids are intended to support teachers in mainstream classes with differentiation.

How does Jigsaw contribute to children's mental health?

There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw helps children learn about mental health; and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health. For example, each lesson plan states clearly which of the five emotional literacy domains it contains so that it is clear of the purpose of that lesson in terms of children’s development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’. Confidence in oneself and awareness of self – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes tricky concepts for children (and adults!) to adopt. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping children to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners. The practice of mindfulness, where children learn to be in the present moment without judgement, is taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the Calm Me time, through visualisation and through breathing techniques. The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness which aims to empower children to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

The Healthy Me Puzzle is where most of the ‘traditional’ health promotion lessons are. From the Eat Well plate and the importance of physical activity for a healthy body (and mind) in the earlier year groups, to the more sophisticated health messages about choice, lifestyle and mental and emotional health promotion in the older year groups, children gain a fully experiential approach to holistic health in Jigsaw – and how it is their responsibility to care for

The latest guidance recommends that schools needs to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learnt by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every year group. A programme like Jigsaw can be so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how children learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health. Each lesson plan states clearly which of the five emotional literacy domains it contains so that it is clear of the purpose of that lesson in terms of children’s development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’. Additionally, everything that schools do in Jigsaw can be linked to positive behaviour policy (which is where the Learning Charter work in Being Me in My World is so useful). More intensive intervention work with more vulnerable children is needed, to ensure that all children’s needs are met – at a universal and a targeted level.

Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for pupils and staff and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

Are the Jigsaw assemblies important?

Definitely! Each Jigsaw Puzzle is launched across the whole school at the same time with a specific assembly designed to appeal to all the year groups. These assemblies initiate key learning messages that are then reinforced in the lessons and Weekly Celebrations.  This helps maintain focus and intention for both children and staff.

Currently there is one assembly for each Puzzle. However, we are writing more suites of assemblies to ensure Jigsaw schools always have access to fresh assemblies.

See the Online Store for Assemblies Suites

As well as the assembly for each Puzzle, we envisage schools will also hold Celebration/Golden Assemblies that will include reference to what children have been doing in Jigsaw that week.

Does Jigsaw fit with the Rights Respecting Schools Award?

Jigsaw aims to empower children to understand their own rights and those of others, and supports the development of global citizenship.

We have mapped the Jigsaw Puzzles’ contribution to the Rights Respecting Schools Award and to the Universal Convention on the Rights of the Child.

See article and mapping grids under A-Z Resources on the website

 

How does Jigsaw compare to SEAL?

SEALJigsaw takes all of the SEAL learning intentions, enhances them and integrates them with all of the outcomes of the National framework for PSHE. Jigsaw gives social and emotional aspects of learning a very high priority and weaves their development into every lesson. All the Jigsaw teaching resources are new.

The difference between Jigsaw and SEAL is that Jigsaw includes all the SEAL learning intentions but uses original materials to both teach and integrate them with their PSHE learning outcomes.

For further information please read the full article How Jigsaw compares to SEAL and the PSHE Framework.

Questions about cost

How much would Jigsaw PSHE for my whole school cost?

The whole set of Jigsaw for the primary school, (F1/2 to Year 6), costs £2925+VAT.

The Jigsaw whole set for Years F1/2 through to Year 6 comprises:

  • 7 Teaching folders: one for F1/2 and one for each other year group 1-6 (these contain all the assemblies, the lesson plans and resources, assessment process and SEN differentiation grids)
  • 7 Jigsaw Friends, one for each year group (additional ones can be purchased @£20 so that each class has its own)
  • 7 Jigsaw Chimes (additional ones can be purchased @£10 so that each class has its own)
  • 1 music CD
  • 1 CD-ROM of all teaching materials and resources

The only additional cost might be to buy a Jigsaw Friend and a Jigsaw Chime for each class if you are more than a one-form entry school, as the whole school set has one of each Friend and 7 chimes.

Our school has only Foundation to Year 2. How much would Jigsaw cost for my school?

We sell Jigsaw by the individual year group @ £450 +VAT per year group.
A Jigsaw Year Group Set comprises:

  • 1 Teachers’ Folder (the Foundation kit contains both F1 and F2)
  • 1 Jigsaw Friend
  • 1 Jigsaw Chime
  • 1 music CD
  • 1 CD-ROM of the specific year group’s materials

The only additional cost might be to buy a Jigsaw Friend and a Jigsaw Chime for each class if you are more than a one-form entry school.

Do I have to pay VAT on Jigsaw?

We are required to charge VAT in the UK by law, however if your school holds a VAT registration you should be able to reclaim it.

I so want Jigsaw for my school but we can’t afford it! What can we do?

We do our best to help schools who are really keen to give Jigsaw to their children.

Discounts

We offer a ‘small school’ discount:

100 or less pupils £150 discount off a whole school set or £20 off each separate year group set if ordered as individual year group sets.

101-200 pupils £100 discount off a whole school set or £20 off each separate year group set if ordered as individual year group sets.

Buying Jigsaw and Discovery RE

We offer a loyalty discount for schools buying Discovery RE AND Jigsaw: £100 off Jigsaw and £50 off Discovery RE

Buying as a cluster or chain of schools

When 3 or more schools buy into Jigsaw at the same time we offer a discount of £100 off each whole school set bought or £20 off each year group set if bought individually.

Will I still need to buy lots of resources If I use Jigsaw?

We listen to teachers and we are aware of limited budgets. Jigsaw has been created as a stand-alone resource. Every lesson plan is directly followed by all the resources needed to deliver it, including games, PowerPoint slides, pictures, etc.

The only exception to this are the story books suggested in some lessons. We have chosen stories familiar to many teachers, so we expect most schools will already have many of the books. We provide a book list to make it easy to see which books the school may need to purchase. If you are unable to purchase these books, you can ask your local lending library to help you source them.

We can also source the books for you but are only able to sell these in Book Bags, one for each Puzzle, as opposed to selling individual books. Please see the Jigsaw Online Store here.

Questions about training

Can you come and train my whole staff on how to use Jigsaw?

The Jigsaw Team is happy to come and offer both introductory training and/or training specific to certain aspects of Jigsaw such as Sex and Relationship Education, or training bespoke to the needs of your school, staff, parents/carers and children.

Contact us with your specific requirements.

Questions about Ofsted and curriculum

Will Jigsaw help with Ofsted?

Ofstead Report ThumbnailWhilst PSHE is still non-statutory, Jigsaw supports schools in their duty to provide:

  • A broad and balanced curriculum
  • Opportunities for SMSC
  • Support for children’s well-being

Furthermore, Jigsaw provides explicit teaching, supporting the ‘Behaviour and Safety’ and ‘Personal Development’ strands of the Ofsted framework, in addition to discrete teaching on diversity, which supports the ‘Equalities’ duty.

Does Jigsaw support the Safeguarding agenda?

Ofsted has stated that schools and colleges should be safe environments where children and young people can learn. Put simply, Jigsaw helps to teach children about the keeping themselves safe and promotes an ethos in school that strongly supports keeping children safe in many diverse situations.

From the Early Years onwards, children are taught about what to say and do if they don’t like something – from encountering strangers to bullying, and from unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. As ever, the emphasis is on helping children realise their independence and responsibility for themselves, rather than employing scare tactics and horror stories to frighten children and dissuade them from choosing certain paths.

Read the Safeguarding article here.

How does Jigsaw contribute to British Values education?

This is an easy one to answer, as Jigsaw contributes to British Values in every single lesson!

We have mapped all Jigsaw lessons against the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs and found that ALL Jigsaw lessons contribute to one or more of these values in some way.

There are two mapping documents: one showing how each Puzzle contributes overall, and the other demonstrating how each individual lesson contributes.

For example, as you would expect, the ‘Being Me In My World’ Puzzle covers lots of the values in most lessons, where citizenship is learnt about; but the ‘Healthy Me’ Puzzle there are also ample opportunities for learning about mutual respect, individual liberty and the rule of law.

You can take a look at the British Values maps here.

Will Jigsaw help us with SMSC?

smsc-bv-discYes, indeed! Even if SMSC were not a high priority for Ofsted, we would still value these aspects of children’s development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them. We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure balanced coverage.

Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to this target and the SMSC symbol clearly indicates which elements are enhanced in each lesson.

How does Jigsaw fit with the National Curriculum?

As an up-to-date, comprehensive and completely original scheme of work for the whole primary school, Jigsaw cannot fail to cover all essential areas of PSHE Education; not only that, but Jigsaw also ensures that SMSC (Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural) development opportunities are mapped throughout.

All of these pieces of learning are brought together to form a cohesive picture, helping children to know and value who they are and understand how they relate to other people the world. And there is differentiated support for SEN.

Jigsaw goes several steps further in the wider curriculum: not only does it cover all areas (and more!) of the non-statutory framework for PSHE, it also has the ability to help deliver particular aspects of the new curriculum. For example, numerous aspects of PSHE can be identified in other subjects, including Science, Music and PE. There is a full article on the website, as well as a mapping document to show how Jigsaw can help to teach numerous areas of the curriculum.

Read the full article here.

Does Jigsaw cover the non-statutory framework for PSHE?

The Non-Statutory National Framework for PSHE KS1 and 2 was written in 2000 and sets out what the curriculum content for PSHE in the Primary phase needs to be. You can find out more here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in-england-framework-for-key-stages-1-to-4/the-national-curriculum-in-england-framework-for-key-stages-1-to-4.

Jigsaw covers all of this framework AND MORE!

The DfE has not updated the Framework since then, though the PSHE Association has written a more up-to-date Programme of Study in 2013 (and updated in 2014). With this in mind, Jigsaw PSHE Ltd has produced a mapping document which cross-references Jigsaw content and the updated Programme of Study from the PSHE Association.  It covers everything in the Programme of Study, and more, including lots on children’s emotional and mental health and well-being; see https://www.jigsawpshe.com/jigsaw-and-the-pshe-association-programme-of-study-2013-making-connections for the accompanying article including a mapping grid.

How does Jigsaw contribute to children’s mental health?

There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw helps children learn about mental health; and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health. For example, each lesson plan states clearly which of the five emotional literacy domains it contains so that it is clear of the purpose of that lesson in terms of children’s development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’. Confidence in oneself and awareness of self – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes tricky concepts for children (and adults!) to adopt. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping children to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners. The practice of mindfulness, where children learn to be in the present moment without judgement, is taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the Calm Me time, through visualisation and through breathing techniques. The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness which aims to empower children to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

The Healthy Me Puzzle is where most of the ‘traditional’ health promotion lessons are. From the Eat Well plate and the importance of physical activity for a healthy body (and mind) in the earlier year groups, to the more sophisticated health messages about choice, lifestyle and mental and emotional health promotion in the older year groups, children gain a fully experiential approach to holistic health in Jigsaw – and how it is their responsibility to care for

The latest guidance recommends that schools needs to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learnt by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every year group. A programme like Jigsaw can be so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how children learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health. Each lesson plan states clearly which of the five emotional literacy domains it contains so that it is clear of the purpose of that lesson in terms of children’s development, not just their ‘knowledge learning’. Additionally, everything that schools do in Jigsaw can be linked to positive behaviour policy (which is where the Learning Charter work in Being Me in My World is so useful). More intensive intervention work with more vulnerable children is needed, to ensure that all children’s needs are met – at a universal and a targeted level.

Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for pupils and staff and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

Does Jigsaw fit with the Rights Respecting Schools Award?

Jigsaw aims to empower children to understand their own rights and those of others, and supports the development of global citizenship.

We have mapped the Jigsaw Puzzles’ contribution to the Rights Respecting Schools Award and to the Universal Convention on the Rights of the Child.

See article and mapping grids under A-Z Resources on the website

 

Questions about ordering Jigsaw and delivery, etc.

How do I order Jigsaw?

Simply complete your online order using our Online Store on the website, send an email or give us a call and we can take your order over the phone.
Our contact details are here.

How long does it take for Jigsaw to be delivered?

You will usually have your Jigsaw materials within 5 working days of placing your order.

Questions about setting up Jigsaw in your school

How much curriculum time is needed to teach Jigsaw lessons?

In Key Stage 1 we would expect at least 45 minutes to be allocated for a Jigsaw lesson.

In Key Stage 2 this increases to 1 hour per lesson.

It is possible to deliver the ‘Connect Us’ activity as a separate entity.

We strongly encourage schools to commit the full one hour a week to the Jigsaw lessons as we have found that more impact is shown quickly when this is the case.

Do we need a Jigsaw Friend for each class?

The Jigsaw Friend is integral to this system of learning. It acts as the ‘talking object’ in the Jigsaw circle and can take on the role of a puppet, helping children talk about sensitive issues; and so the children will develop a relationship with their Jigsaw Friend.

It is, therefore, really important that each class has its own Friend. The Friends need to be respected and treated as special in order to have the most impact.

We do not sell Jigsaw Friends to anyone other than schools using Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, in order to keep their fidelity and specialness for children.

Do I have to use the Jigsaw Chime or can I use another instrument?

Classroom Chime

The Jigsaw Chimes have been specially selected for their pitch and duration of resonance. This helps children to focus for longer when listening to them. The sound helps draw a line between whatever they were previously thinking about and the focus of the ‘Calm Me’ time. So, we strongly recommend the Jigsaw chimes are used instead of any other instrument. The Jigsaw Chimes really work.

How do I use the Jigsaw Chime with a hearing-impaired child?

The resonance of the Jigsaw Chime may bother a hearing-impaired child (with hearing aids). We recommend teachers to encourage the child to sit close to the chime with their fingers on the table next to the chime. They will then feel the resonance in their bodies.

Are the Jigsaw assemblies important?

Definitely! Each Jigsaw Puzzle is launched across the whole school at the same time with a specific assembly designed to appeal to all the year groups. These assemblies initiate key learning messages that are then reinforced in the lessons and Weekly Celebrations.  This helps maintain focus and intention for both children and staff.

Currently there is one assembly for each Puzzle. However, we are writing more suites of assemblies to ensure Jigsaw schools always have access to fresh assemblies.

See the Online Store for Assemblies Suites

As well as the assembly for each Puzzle, we envisage schools will also hold Celebration/Golden Assemblies that will include reference to what children have been doing in Jigsaw that week.

How do I load the songs CD onto our school server?

Music and Songs CDAll the resource CD’s are in a computer readable CDROM format, however, the Music and Songs CD is written as an Audio CD, intended to be played in a standard CD player at school assemblies.

If you wish to transfer these songs to a central computer, the audio files on the CD must be first ‘ripped’ converted into computer readable digital files using suitable music library software.

Warning: Some schools have had issues with their software refusing to play the MP3’s after being used several times because their software imposed invisible restrictions on the files. Microsoft recently changed the way their software works for rights-managed files, which is related to music industry copy protection.

To help our Jigsaw schools, we now supply ready-made MP3’s of these songs (without this restriction) which can be downloaded now on the Jigsaw Community page under ‘Updates’.

This issue only affects our original Music and Songs CD.  Our newer Music and Songs CD’s will be supplied with ready-made MP3’s as detailed in the product description.

How do we use Jigsaw Journals and where do we download the Journal covers from?

It is important that children see their Jigsaw work as valuable and that they play an active role in assessing their learning progress. It is also important that teachers can evidence their children’s PSHE learning – hence the concept of Jigsaw Journals.

We suggest each child has a Jigsaw Journal in which to collect personal work, photographs, certificates and reflections. Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) has a ‘Help Me Reflect’ element. This invites the children to reflect on aspects of their learning. We envisage that they record their reflections in their Journals along with the assessment process. The Journals can support transition, moving through the school with the children.

To make the Journals affordable, we have designed special front covers for each Year Group. These can be printed from the Teaching Materials CD-ROM or downloaded from the Community section above, glued onto exercise books or scrap books, (possibly laminated, too), in order to give children’s work the Jigsaw identity.

Some schools are making class Jigsaw Journals, collecting a range of work across each Puzzle and annotating with teacher’s and children’s comments, and displaying them around the school (with the children’s permission).

How does Jigsaw fit Into our creative curriculum?

There is not an easy answer to this because each school will need to consider how each Jigsaw Puzzle fits into, and contributes to, the creative curriculum topics it has designed.

We are happy to advise and discuss this, as it will probably look different in each school. We are, however, finding that because Jigsaw is a whole-school approach, it works well sitting alongside a creative curriculum.

Will I still need to buy lots of resources if I use Jigsaw?

We listen to teachers and we are aware of limited budgets. Jigsaw has been created as a stand-alone resource. Every lesson plan is directly followed by all the resources needed to deliver it, including games, PowerPoint slides, pictures, etc.

The only exception to this are the story books suggested in some lessons. We have chosen stories familiar to many teachers, so we expect most schools will already have many of the books. We provide a book list to make it easy to see which books the school may need to purchase. If you are unable to purchase these books, you can ask your local lending library to help you source them.

We can also source the books for you but are only able to sell these in Book Bags, one for each Puzzle, as opposed to selling individual books. Please see the Jigsaw Online Store here.

If we haven’t got much time, which bits of a Jigsaw lesson can we cut?

We understand time restraints and how difficult it is to fit everything into a pressurised curriculum. However, each Jigsaw lesson is designed with the learning process in mind. We believe Jigsaw has the most impact when the lessons are delivered as written. Much care has been taken to structure the lessons in line with how learning happens and how the brain works.

It is possible, though, to separate the ‘Connect Us’ aspect and deliver it at another occasion so children can still benefit their social skills with the ‘Connect Us’ activities.

Some teachers are selective about the ‘Let Me Learn’ section, and this is fine as long as the learning intentions are still met.

Can my TA teach Jigsaw In PPA time?

TAs and HLTAs can teach Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE. The lesson plans are detailed and all the resources are included. However, we strongly recommend that teachers deliver Jigsaw as this programme provides on-going opportunities to get to know and build a strong relationship with the children. It also enables teachers to use the strategies in Jigsaw across the curriculum.

Can I buy just the Relationships and Changing Me Puzzles?

With any scheme of work that is progressive and developmental, splitting it up into separate units could mean that its integrity is lost, as these separated units could perhaps be viewed as an add-on, which, in our view, is not the point of high-quality PSHE.

If children and staff haven’t used the whole scheme up to that point, jumping in with potentially the most sensitive elements of the scheme could be more than challenging, particularly as the scheme’s philosophy and approach are unique. Therefore, to maintain the fidelity of the scheme, we do not  be offering individual units separately.

Is the SRE in Jigsaw suitable for Catholic schools?

The SRE that we teach in Jigsaw has two main functions: to help children enjoy successful relationships (with friends, siblings, parents, etc.) and to keep them safe, now and in the future. The Jigsaw sex education Pieces (lessons) in the Changing Me Puzzle (unit) aim to give children their entitlement to information about puberty and human reproduction, appropriate to their age and stage of development. It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values and there is a strong safeguarding element to the ‘Changing Me’ Puzzle (as there is throughout Jigsaw).

The sex education in Jigsaw is progressive and developmental and has a strong focus on children understanding the changes that their bodies go through, so that they can grow up without fear or embarrassment.

The SRE materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit apppropriately with the individual philosophy and ethos of that school. Catholic schools will obviously need to check their own diocesan advice during this process.

There are lots of Catholic schools using Jigsaw and some of these are implementing the Changing Me materials as they are, others have tweaked them to fit their requirements. For example, in Jigsaw we use specially-designed animations to help teach some of the elements of sex education: most schools use the animations, while some schools choose not to. It’s your choice – there is no obligation either way.

We are very happy to assist with this if you decide to purchase Jigsaw and we do run SRE training sessions every March to enable schools to look at these materials with us in plenty of time before delivering them in Summer 2.

How can I deliver Jigsaw to my split classes?

There are a couple of options. Some schools have taught in mixed year groups in their first year of using Jigsaw to see how it goes. If, for example, you had a class of Year 3 and 4 children, you could teach the Year 3 lessons for one year, then the Year 4 lessons the next year – to have a rolling programme. In other schools, teachers reorganise the classes and timetable once a week to enable the Year 3 children to have the Year 3 lessons and the Year 4 children to have the Year 4 lessons.  Some schools make a hybrid version of the lessons combining elements from 2 year groups.

It is important to remember that Jigsaw has been written to be sequential and developmental, each Puzzle building on the previous one, and each year group building on the previous one, so finding a way to embrace this structure will be essential if children are to get the most out of the programme.

Feel free to teach Jigsaw however you feel would work best in your school, being mindful of the Jigsaw Approach and the philosophy of Jigsaw. You might come up with an even better way to do it! In which case, do let us know about it – we are always keen to celebrate schools’ successes and pass them on so others can benefit from your experience.
We are happy to help you work out what might work best for your children. Do contact us.

Questions about 'try before you buy'

Do you offer inspection copies of Jigsaw?

Jigsaw Inspection StickWe now offer inspection samples with an unlimited viewing time, in electronic format on a handy ‘inspection stick’, a flash memory stick which is USB 2 and 3 compatible.

To order your Jigsaw inspection stick, click here.

Note there are full instructions and additional help in the following FAQ.

How do I use the Inspection Stick?

When your Inspection Stick arrives.

Jigsaw Inspection StickInsert the USB stick into your computer’s USB port.  You may need to wait a moment for your anti-virus scan to complete before you can access the device. Note some schools may employ a USB port blocking technology to protect the network from malware. It this is the case, you will need to ask your system administrator for assistance.

When you first open the stick in Windows Explorer or Apple Finder, a window will open and display a number of visible files and folders.

Double-click the Welcome(.html) or Index(.html) file to begin your Tour.

Your default web browser will automatically launch and the Welcome page (shown here) will appear.

Screen Shot

Screen Shot

Our inspection material is presented like a local website.  An internet connection is not needed to view these materials.

What’s on the stick?

Your inspection stick contains:

  • An introductory welcome letter
  • 3 Videos including an introduction and detailed walk-through
  • Sample lesson plan overviews
  • 8 complete lessons; 1 selected from each year group (Foundation 1, 2 and Year 1 through 6) with each of the puzzles being represented over the entire sample set
  • Free Jigsaw song, sung by children
  • Other useful leaflets and information

During playback of videos, you can expand them to full screen using the on-screen controls that are overlaid in the video window, without losing your place in the web browser.

Technical Support

If for some reason your web-browser cannot play the embedded video content, you can play them manually outside your web browser as follows:

Navigate your way through the files and folders on the stick (folder ‘stick1.1’ if listed first) then into the ‘video’ folder.  You will see all the videos in numerical order and should be able to play them all from there.

If you still have trouble, please first ask your I.T. department for assistance to ensure you have the required software installed on your computer to play H.264 encoded videos with AAC encoded sound. We have tested these videos with Microsoft Windows Media Player, Apple Quicktime and VLC player and all function perfectly.

If you have any questions regarding the sample materials, please call our team on the number(s) provided at the bottom of this page.